My wife and I went on a holiday las year to visit her family in the UK and went to Paris and Krakow. We spent a day at Auschwitz. My mother had an interest in all the documentaries on World War II. She numerous ones on Auschwitz. I have often wondered why, maybe it was vain hope that she see her father Antoni in one the grainy films. That day we spent at Auschwitz has changed my life forever. To Americans, do not give up your guns, Australia is already lost.

Here are Mum and Dad in 1946. Dad with his funny little mustache and the second photo of my Mum on her IRO application to come to Australia. They made a great life for themselves and us. They endured some of the bigotry that some immigrants go through. Everybody that came it contact with them knew them as Dinky Dy True Blue New Aussies that would do anything for anybody and were generous to a fault.

This next photo is from her ID that was in 1945 just before the war ended. The toll on her face shows the reality of war. I had a question that I needed to ask an was embarrassed and ashamed to even ask it. "Were you assaulted or attacked by the Nazis? Mum's reply was "No" Mum was a defiant and strong woman, she was fluent in her native Polish,
French, German, Italian, English eventually, widely read and took an interest in my reading of David Irving's books.

He was not joking and it was only when I came across my parents water time papers, their ID card that was issued to them by the Nazis that I was confronted and summoned the desire to delve further into our history. My Mum's ID cards started of from when she was 16. The first photo is Mum at 15 in the woods not far from her home. The second is her ID papers.

QuodVerum Forum

Those who label words as violence do so with the sole purpose of justifying violence against words.